IWD 2020 – Celebrating women in rural health.

FOR Goldfields Physio director Diane Lukasiewich International Women’s Day (IWD) is all about celebrating women and their achievements.

The Canada native who has called Kalgoorlie home since 2004, said this IWD it was important to raise each other up.

“We often don’t sing our praises or celebrate our wins,” she said.
”I think it’s because we are too busy getting things done but recognition and reflection is
essential.
“It is important for the youth of today to be able to have strong role models and understand how far we have come.”

Having worked in Physio since 1997 and with a Master of Musculoskeletal Science at the University of Western Australia, Diane began her Goldfields career in reception at Boulder Medical while awaiting her credentialing.

“Once that came through I started working at Goldfields Physio,” she said.
“Kalgoorlie initially was only meant to be a stepping stone, but once I was working and settled in, I realised how much the community offered.
“I was promoted to manager in 2005 and then decided to open my own practice.
“When I went to resign the owner offered me the practice and I jumped at the chance, purchasing the practice in 2007.”

Since then she has been awarded the businessperson of the year and continues to grow the business, attributing her drive to succeed to her parents.

“Both my parents had polio and were in wheelchairs,” she said.
“They did an amazing job of raising my sister and myself.
“Both didn’t believe in can’t or never.
“I think they were both great role models growing up. They really believed the only barriers you face are the ones you put in front of yourself.
“Obstacles may be hard to overcome but persistence, resilience, and a desire to change, adapt and grow will see you achieve pretty much anything you set your mind to – I live by this every day.”

Dedicating this IWD to her mum, Diane said she would spend this year with strong, talented women.

“My biggest female role model is my mum, she became the first teacher in a wheelchair to teach in the normal / public school system in Alberta,” she said.
“When they wanted to pigeon hole her into teaching kids with disabilities she fought to teach in the public school system believing she would have the most impact there – and she did.
“I saw her change the way kids and parents thought about disabilities.
“She broke down barriers every day while making kids enthusiastic to learn.
“She made me want to be better every day – she still does.”

 

PICTURE COURTESY OF GOLDFIELDS PHYSIO